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Philadelphia Real Estate Blog

Another suburbanite packs up and moves into Philly; if living over the store has been a dream of yours, there's a nice one coming to Kensington that you might want to consider; the Preservation Alliance steps up its alarm-bell-ringing in hopes of saving more of Greater Philadelphia's endangered historic places; and the biggest little flophouse in Washington Square West is shuttered after a one-alarm fire, and at least one reporter wonders, Might this be for good?

NXTsports picks Navy Yard for new headquarters (Philadelphia Business Journal)
On the Rental Market: Live Above the Future Kensington Community Food Co-op (Curbed Philly) 
Preservation Alliance Announces "Places to Save" List (Hidden City Daily)
Bad News Bears: There Was a Small Fire at the

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Most Americans find homeownership beats renting for many reasons. But there are a number of reasons why one might choose to rent instead.

Yesterday, we explained why, for the great majority of Americans, buying a home of their own makes sense.

But it doesn't make sense for everyone. There are those for whom renting is the better alternative - sometimes even if it costs more than buying in the long run.

Here are the reasons someone looking for a place to live may prefer to rent instead:

The process is easier and simpler. It still takes time to find a suitable apartment to rent, but unless the local rental market is very tight, there are usually plenty of units to choose from, and many will probably meet most renters' needs. Once the would-be

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It's hard these days to walk through Francisville and not find construction under way somewhere. Our recent swing through the area last week revealed progress on several projects we've been following and some new ones under way.

This new structure at 702-04 N. 20th St. falls into the latter category.

According to permit data on file with Licenses and Inspections, this will be "a three (3) story structure for use as a six (6) family dwelling." In other words, judging from the looks of the structure now rising, two three-unit apartment townhomes.

The framing suggests that each will have their own entrance, as opposed to a single common entrance as found on a similar structure now nearing completion at the other end of this block (which we

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As you search the listings on this site, we're sure you will find a home you'd love to live in. In this first installment in a series on home buying, we offer some reasons you should buy it.

Of course, we're here to help you buy the home of your dreams. When you're ready to buy that new Philly home, we hope you turn to us first.

But if you're not a homeowner now, you should consider whether buying or renting makes more sense for you before you take the plunge.

In this article, we will examine some of the reasons homeownership makes more sense for most Americans, and may make more sense for you now.

It costs less than renting, especially in the long run. Today's house prices may seem daunting, but when you spread out the cost of ownership over

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We all know the sad stories of renters forced out of gentrifying neighborhoods by rising rents. But what about the people who live in places where rent is cheap because the housing stock is in sad shape - and still can't afford a place to live?; Inga Saffron looks at Philly's new "inclusionary housing" incentives and wonders whether they really help who they're intended to help; Bart Blatstein's AC buy hasn't cooled his ardor for The Provence - and he's getting tired of waiting for the verdict on that second casino license; and commercial real estate investors who have traditionally passed Philly over in favor of New York and Washington are giving the city's office buildings a second look:

The Housing Crisis We Don't Talk About (Next City)
Changing

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As the inheritor of the legacy of Carl Dranoff's first development company, Historic Landmarks for Living, Philadelphia-based Reinhold Residential is an old hand at preserving the historic integrity of the residential buildings it owns and manages. This Thursday, it will formally take the wraps off its latest restoration project, one that revives the spirit and original purpose of its Art Deco gem, The Metropolitan (above).

That would be the building's gym, now dubbed MetroFit and open to all Reinhold residents. One of the amenities every YMCA in the country offered its members was a place to exercise, and the YMCA Armed Forces Building, built in 1926-28 at 117 N. 15th St. in Center City, was no exception. Originally built as the Navy Annex of the

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What's new in Old City? For starters, this listing for a strikingly sleek modern condo on New Street.

These photos should give you a sense of the incredible lightness of being at home here, thanks to natural light supplied by the unit's huge, nearly floor-to-ceiling windows. Hardwood floors and recessed lighting throughout the unit also add to its lightness, as do its high ceilings.

This unit puts its best foot forward, greeting you on entry with a stylish, high-end Poggenpohl kitchen equipped with Miele stainless steel appliances, granite countertops and cabinetry that's simply elegant. Off the kitchen near the entrance is a powder room that has been converted to a laundry and storage room; it can be converted back into a guest half

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The apartment/retail component of the MM Partners-ADCO project

By Gabriel Gottlieb

The Philadelphia City Planning Commission’s Civic Design Review (CDR) committee recently heard a presentation about the redevelopment of a long-vacant site at the southeast corner of 27th Street and Girard Avenue, where Fairmount and Brewerytown meet.  The site extends all the way south to the North Star Bar at 27th and Poplar streets and east to Taney Street.  Previous proposals for the site included a drive-through McDonald’s and a supermarket.  Now, developers MM Partners and American Development Company (ADCO) propose building a five-story apartment building and townhouses on the site.  They presented their plans to the CDR committee on October 7.

Glenn Warner

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Marie Beschke Bontigao told Forbes in 2011 that she wanted to "give back to the community." Turns out "take from the community" is more like it; when is a sewage overflow tank not a sewage overflow tank? When it's part of a major green infrastructure initiative that's about more than sanitary engineering; Hidden City preps us for Halloween by taking us on a tour of Dead Philadelphia, beginning with the mysterious tombstones embedded in the Presbyterian Historical Society's back wall; and there's a social media site out there that has a drone flyover of Philly you've got to see to believe:

West Chester Woman Accused of Real Estate Ponzi Scheme (Philadelphia)
The City of Philadelphia Wants You to Stop Ignoring Icky Overflowing Sewers (Next City) 
The

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In case you haven't figured this out yet, we're bird lovers here. Our favorite species: the construction crane.

As we noted in an earlier post, several of these creatures have landed in University City recently, just about all of them busily building nests for new residents.

The crane in these photos is at work on a new mixed-use project being built by Drexel University at the southwest corner of 34th Street and Lancaster Avenue. The Lancaster Square project, designed by Chicago-based Solomon Cordwell Buenz architects, combines apartments and suites for more than 1,300 Drexel students with a new student and community dining center and 20,000 square feet of retail space, mostly along Lancaster Avenue.

As you can see in these photos, work

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